Forum

Factors Impacting D...
 
Notifications
Clear all
Factors Impacting Doberman Obedience Training
Factors Impacting Doberman Obedience Training
Group: Registered
Joined: 2022-05-16
New Member

About Me

Last night I was serenaded throughout the night by my neighbor's noisy pack of dogs. Because last night had a full moon, the coyotes were out and disturbing the neighborhood dogs with their yapping and howling. My dogs also joined in with the others when they first heard the coyotes start in, but as soon as I told them to quiet down, they obeyed. Apparently the neighbor's sleep like the dead, because they never quiet their dogs at night.

 

 

 

 

If the why does my dog bark at other dogs won't crate or leash willingly and you're out of time, you will need to corner him. In a small area, this is easily accomplished; just be sure to maintain NON-THREATENING body language the entire time. For example: don't look directly at him, approach sideways, move slowly and calmly. Don't reach over his head, other than to gently drape a blanket or towel over it...if he can't see you, it can have a calming effect, and the towel also makes it much harder for him to deliver a fear bite. It is very important to read up on, and fully understand, canine body language and calming signals before ever attempting to corner a fearful dog (or any dog, really).

 

 

 

 

Dogs at community parks should have friendly and outgoing personalities and display proper social etiquette. They should not be overbearing, obnoxious or bullying. They should also be obedient to basic commands of their owner such as "come" or "sit and stay".

 

 

 

 

It is also imperative that you be consistent and persistent in your dog obedience training. Most of the time your dog will not change their behavior in a single day. If you stay consistent the way you are training them and be sure not to give up, your dog will learn what you are teaching them, it can just take time. It is important not to give up on them if they haven't made any progress after just one day. If you keep your eye on the prize and work with them, all of your hard work will pay off.

 

 

 

 

Once I gave the treats, I ignored the dogs, or they would hound me for more treats, and eventually they would come to me, get their treat, and gradually wander back to their previous activities of grazing, searching for non-existent rabbits, etc. Then I stepped up the training. Calling the dogs to me in the middle of the back yard is one thing, but having them all race to me at the back door is entirely different. Calling from the back door means that they might have to come inside the house, and inside means no wrestling, barking, and acting like crazy dogs. Outside is far more fun on a sunny day!

 

 

 

 

If your dog is alerting you to something, teach it that once you have checked out the situation and you have indicated that everything is ok; your dog must stop barking. My reactive dogs have learned that I want them to alert me to things on the property or that could pose a threat. As soon as I have checked it out and indicated everything is ok, my dog does not need to alert me anymore.

 

 

 

 

Here are some training tips that may help while walking your dog. First off, have the attitude that you are in charge and the one who is doing the walking not the one being dragged down the street. Establishing leadership starts when you are putting on your dog's leash. Is your dog going nuts and being hyper? Then wait until it calms down or put it in a "Sit/stay" and wait until it is calmer. Don't reward it for undesirable behavior. Once calm and leashed, do not let it pull the lash tight. The industry standard is a "loose leash." We want to walk with a leash that has some slack in it. That way I there were an incident there is some slack to use to manage any reactive situations that may arise. But, it also just makes for a more relaxed walk for both you and your dog.

 

 

 

 

Moving objects such as cats, squirrels and kids on bikes are harder. Try them only when your dogs' behavior is consistent. If it's not working then you've simply gone too far too fast. Just back up a bit and try again.

 

 

 

 

The scene in a dog barking at dogs; try what he says, obedience school is just like life. In life there is a lot of noise, so much things going on, etc. In these classrooms there is a lot of noise to show them that they must learn no matter what the scenario is. It really teaches them to concentrate fully, and since they have been taught all aspects of obedience in this type of situation then they will definitely become well trained.

 

 

 

 

So how do you actively control behavior? There are numerous ways. What it boils down to is keeping the dog with you, in a crate or kennel, or in a position such that if he decides to do something wrong you can do something about it. Every time your dog does something wrong and you aren't able to address it, you are training your dog. You are passively training him to do something wrong. Do this over and over and now you've got a dog who jumps on people, pees in the house, chews your sofa, and performs other negative behaviors.

Location

Occupation

try what he says
Social Networks
Member Activity
0
Forum Posts
0
Topics
0
Questions
0
Answers
0
Question Comments
0
Liked
0
Received Likes
0/10
Rating
0
Blog Posts
0
Blog Comments
Share: